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INNER PEACE

Inner peace is the inexhaustible source of self-confidence.

Most people could attain inner peace through sitting and walking meditation with various usual practices : mindfulness or right attention, yoga, shamatha, zazen and kinhin.
Some people could attain inner peace by chanting mantras thousands of times.
The mind is intrinsically pure, quiet and clear.
Too often it seems confused, agitated and darkened.
Meditation means training the mind and also training the speech and the body.
Peace of mind implies the silence of the mind, the speech and body.
It is within this silence that we contemplate our real motivations and intentions in order to change ourselves and to change the world.

The meditation allows us to reach the peace of mind, the progress is illustrated by the nine stages of the path of the elephant or the ten ox-herding pictures.
The more we meditate in an intensive and regular way, the more we decrease fears and the more we cultivate self-confidence.
We decrease also little by little the doubts, and we can regain self-esteem which is bound to the integrity of our self-image.
The tranquillity of mind is the good antidote against agitation, pessimism, confusion, helplessness and resentment.

Many scientific studies showed the benefits of meditation, exploring the psychological and physiological effects.
Some studies directly observe brain physiology and neural activity in living subjects, either during the act of meditation itself, or before and after a meditation effort, thus allowing linkages to be established between meditative practice and changes in brain structure or function.










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